Fire safety tips apply to children, adults alike

October 8, 2009 at 9:38 pm Leave a comment

*published Oct. 8, 2009

louviere

Fire Chief Tony Louviere gives Reagan Broussard, 5, a fireman’s hat while, Amber Wells of the Woodlawn Volunteer Fire Department discusses fire prevention and safety tips in a visit with prekindergarten students Tuesday at Lacassine High School. Students toured fire trucks and learned fire safety tips from firefighters from Lacassine and Woodlawn fire departments as part of Fire Prevention Week. BY DORIS MARICLE

Fire Chief Tony Louviere gives Reagan Broussard, 5, a fireman’s hat while, Amber Wells of the Woodlawn Volunteer Fire Department discusses fire prevention and safety tips in a visit with prekindergarten students Tuesday at Lacassine High School. Students toured fire trucks and learned fire safety tips from firefighters from Lacassine and Woodlawn fire departments as part of Fire Prevention Week. BY DORIS MARICLE

BY VANESSA C. DEGGINS
Members of the Lake Charles Fire Department are spending this year’s Fire Prevention Week talking to schoolchildren about fire safety, but there are a few things adults need to know, too.

To wit: Pay attention when you’re cooking.

“Too many people leave the kitchen and get sidetracked,” said Chief T.A. Jones. “Even if it’s a short period of time, turn the stove off.”

Jones, citing national statistics, said cooking fires are the leading cause of home fires and injuries.

And: Smoke cigarettes, cigars and pipes outside. Smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths.

“If they are inside, make sure smokers have deep, sturdy ashtrays,” Jones said. “Never smoke if you are tired, have had alcohol or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy.”

The second-leading cause of fire deaths is heating, Jones said. “People need to pay attention to where they put heaters, and make sure you have your chimneys cleaned and inspected before each winter.”

In 2008, the Lake Charles Fire Department responded to 2,571 calls, according to records. Those calls included 114 reports of building fires and 210 reports of cooking fires.

Jones said the estimated damage was $4.2 million.

Fire Prevention Day, which eventually became Fire Prevention Week, was created in 1920 after the Great Chicago Fire, which killed more than 250 people and burned more than 100,000 homes and buildings.

The event inspired new safety codes and the regular promotion of safe practices.

link: http://bit.ly/3iDxg

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